Login / Register

Username:


Password: [Lost?]



New User? Click here for your FREE subscription



Respiratory Care Professionals
Respiratory Care Professionals Respiratory Care Professionals

Follow Us


NEWS-Line on Twitter NEWS-Line on Facebook NEWS-Line on Google+ NEWS-Line on LinkedIn NEWS-Line on Pinterest


Respiratory Conferences &
Educational Opportunities



July 15 - 15

Forum

AARC

Nov. 5 - 05

Congress

AARC

More Events

Head Injury is Associated with Doubled Mortality Rate Long-Term, Penn Study Finds | NEWS-Line for Respiratory Care Professionals

Head Injury is Associated with Doubled Mortality Rate Long-Term, Penn Study Finds


Source:

Adults who suffered any head injury during a 30-year study period had two times the rate of mortality than those who did not have any head injury, and mortality rates among those with moderate or severe head injuries were nearly three times higher, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, published in JAMA Neurology.

In the United States, over 23 million adults age 40 or older report a history of head injury with loss of consciousness. Head injury can be attributed to a number of causes, from motor vehicle crashes, unintentional falls, or sports injuries. What’s more, head injury has been linked with a number of long-term health conditions, including disability, late-onset epilepsy, dementia, and stroke.

Studies have previously shown increased short-term mortality associated with head injuries primarily among hospitalized patients. This longitudinal study evaluated 30 years of data from over 13,000 community-dwelling participants (those not hospitalized or living in nursing home facilities) to determine if head injury has an impact on mortality rates in adults over the long term. Investigators found that 18.4 percent of the participants reported one or more head injuries during the study period, and of those who suffered a head injury, 12.4 percent were recorded as moderate or severe. The median period of time between a head injury and death was 4.7 years.

Death from all causes was recorded in 64.6 percent of those individuals who suffered a head injury, and in 54.6 percent of those without any head injury. Accounting for participant characteristics, investigators found that the mortality rate from all-causes among participants with a head injury was 2.21 times the mortality rate among those with no head injury. Further, the mortality rate among those with more severe head injuries was 2.87 times the mortality rate among those with no head injury.

“Our data reveals that head injury is associated with increased mortality rates even long-term. This is particularly the case for individuals with multiple or severe head injuries,” explained the study’s lead author, Holly Elser, MD, PhD, MPH a Neurology resident at Penn. “This highlights the importance of safety measures, like wearing helmets and seatbelts, to prevent head injuries.”

Investigators also evaluated the data for specific causes of death among all participants. Overall, the most common causes of death were cancers, cardiovascular disease, and neurologic disorders (which include dementia, epilepsy, and stroke). Among individuals with head injuries, deaths caused by neurologic disorders and unintentional injury or trauma (like falls) occurred more frequently.

When investigators evaluated specific neurologic causes of death among participants with head injury, they found that nearly two-thirds of neurologic causes of death were attributed to neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. These diseases composed a greater proportion of overall deaths among individuals with head injury (14.2 percent) versus those without (6.6 percent).

“Study data doesn’t explain why the cause of death in individuals with head injuries is more likely to be from neurodegenerative diseases, which underscores the need for further research into the relationship between these disorders, head injury, and death,” said Andrea L.C. Schneider, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of Neurology at Penn.

Study data was from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study, an ongoing community-based study of 15,792 participants aged 45–65 years, who were recruited from the suburbs of Minneapolis, Minnesota, Washington County, Maryland, Forsyth County, North Carolina, and Jackson, Mississippi in 1987–1989.

Funding for this research was provided by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (7592022D00001, 75N92022D00002, 75N92022D00003, 75N92022D00004, 75N92022D00005) and the National Institutes of Health (U01HL096812, U01HL096814, U01HL096899, U01HL096902, and U01HL096917).

TOPIC: Neurology and Neurosurgery
Penn Medicine is one of the world’s leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. Penn Medicine consists of the Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (founded in 1765 as the nation’s first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which together form a $9.9 billion enterprise.

The Perelman School of Medicine has been ranked among the top medical schools in the United States for more than 20 years, according to U.S. News & World Report's survey of research-oriented medical schools. The School is consistently among the nation's top recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with $546 million awarded in the 2021 fiscal year.

The University of Pennsylvania Health System’s patient care facilities include: the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Penn Presbyterian Medical Center—which are recognized as one of the nation’s top “Honor Roll” hospitals by U.S. News & World Report—Chester County Hospital; Lancaster General Health; Penn Medicine Princeton Health; and Pennsylvania Hospital, the nation’s first hospital, founded in 1751. Additional facilities and enterprises include Good Shepherd Penn Partners, Penn Medicine at Home, Lancaster Behavioral Health Hospital, and Princeton House Behavioral Health, among others.

Penn Medicine is powered by a talented and dedicated workforce of more than 47,000 people. The organization also has alliances with top community health systems across both Southeastern Pennsylvania and Southern New Jersey, creating more options for patients no matter where they live.

Penn Medicine is committed to improving lives and health through a variety of community-based programs and activities. In fiscal year 2021, Penn Medicine provided more than $619 million to benefit our community.

Source & Photo: Penn Medicine

Pictured: A physician holding up an x-ray sheet in front of a patient








Share This!


Respiratory Jobs


Respiratory Therapy Positions,

CGH Medical Center
Sterling, Illinois

Respiratory Therapist

Regional West Health Services
Scottsbluff, Nebraska

Respiratory Therapy Positions

CGH Medical Center
Sterling, Illinois

Registered Respiratory Therapists - Up to $20K Sign On Bonuses and Relocation Assistance available!!! - Both Experienced and New Graduates may qualify!!!

Sentara Healthcare
Virginia

Registered Respiratory Therapists - Up to $20K Sign On Bonuses and Relocation Assistance available!!! - Both Experienced and New Graduates may qualify!!!

Sentara Healthcare
North Carolina

Respiratory Therapist Opportunities for Experienced RRTs and New Grads! • Positions working with Adults and in Neonatal/Pediatrics • $20,000 Sign-On Bonus - Relocation Assistance Available!

Carilion Clinic
Christiansburg, Virginia

More Jobs
(Dismiss) Thank you for visiting NEWS-Line! Please sign up, login, or follow us on your favorite social networks
to receive custom tailored eNews, job listings, and educational opportunities for your specific profession.