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Here is your NEWS-Line for Nurses eNewsletter. For the latest news, jobs, education and blogs, bookmark our news page and job board or to take us everywhere with you, save this link to your phone. Also, enjoy the latest issue of NEWS-Line for Nurses magazine, always free.



NEWS:

Cedars-Sinai Experts Lift a 'Sinking' Brain

Russell Secker, now 67, was in Lake Tahoe in 2016 to run a series of ultra-distance races with his wife, Claire. The two had completed hundreds of marathons and races totaling thousands of miles. But this time was different. A terrible headache and shortness of breath took Russell, a native of England, out of the running.

"It was a multiday race and he did just one day, not even the full race, and when he finished, he was just gray," said Claire. "He looked awful. He felt awful. We were a bit worried about it, but we just thought maybe it was the altitude."

What the Seckers didn’t know was that Russell had a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, and that his symptoms were just beginning. It took a marathon journey through the British health system before he reached Wouter Schievink, MD, director of the CSF Leak Program at Cedars-Sinai, who used a novel technique to find and repair the leak

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Penn Study: Text Messaging Shows Promise in Reaching Unvaccinated Patients

Automated text messaging was as effective as direct phone calls in getting unvaccinated patients to seek out a COVID-19 shot, according to a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania that demonstrated the possibility of lower-cost alternatives to traditional patient outreach. The research was published today in JAMA Network Open.

“The take-away is that the text arms of our study were comparable to the phone-only arm, but the text messaging is less resource-intensive since a live call center only needs to talk to those who are already interested instead of making cold calls to everyone on the list,” said the study’s lead author, Shivan Mehta, MD, an assistant professor of Medicine and the associate chief innovation officer at Penn Medicine.

Although the researchers had hypothesized that using texting to guide more patients to vaccination might reac

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NIH-Supported Study Links Poor Sleep To Increased Risk of COPD Flare-Ups

Poor sleep is associated with a significantly increased risk of life-threatening flare-ups in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, according to a new study supported by the National Institutes of Health. The risk for these flare-ups – sudden bouts of worsening breathing – was 25% to 95% higher in people who experienced poor sleep than in people who had good quality sleep. The findings suggest that poor sleep may be a better predictor of flare-ups than even a person’s history of smoking.

The observational study, one of the largest to look at the links between sleep quality and COPD flare-ups, was largely funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the NIH. Its findings appear online on June 6 in the journal Sleep.

COPD, a progressive, incurable lung condition that makes breathing difficult, affects more than 16 million adults in the U

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Take These 7 Healthy Habits On Your Summer Road Trip

You've spent the past couple of years staying fit and healthy despite the unusual circumstances of mostly staying home.

Now you're packing the car for a well-deserved summer road trip, fraught with fast food, convenience stores and hours of sitting around with unhealthy snacks within arm's reach.

Can you keep up the good work? You can, experts say – if you plan.

"The idea is to keep to one's routine and healthy habits as much as possible on the road, just as you do at home," said Dr. Ian Neeland, a preventive cardiologist and associate professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland.

Preventive cardiologist Dr. Puja Mehta concurs.

"Everything is in the planning," said Mehta, associate professor in the Emory Women's Heart Center at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta. "It can be a lot of fun and relieve a lot of stress along the way."

So while

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